Triad Living Mag

Love & Live North Carolina

Latest Posts

Downtown Greensboro Inc. seeks community volunteers

Downtown Greensboro Inc. is seeking volunteers to assist with outreach efforts at community events. The nonprofit organization participates in several local events and festivals to share information about the exciting transformations happening downtown.

Volunteers with civic pride in Greensboro’s community and  an interest in the downtown area are invited to join in as event volunteers. Duties include staffing event tables, distributing free downtown walking guides and other materials, answering simple questions about downtown, and registering visitors to participate in giveaways at events like First Friday and the Beach Music series.

For more information, call (336) 379-0060, ext 21, or e-mail vickie@downtowngreensboro.net.

Perdue proclaims April N.C. Guardian ad Litem Child Advocate Month

Gov. Beverly Perdue has proclaimed April as North Carolina Guardian ad Litem (GAL) Child Advocate Month in recognition of the program’s mission of protecting and promoting the best interests of children in abuse and neglect court proceedings. While appreciating advocates who have donated more than 944,000 hours of service to children in all 100 counties, the proclamation also serves as a reminder of the immense need for more volunteers.

Perdue’s proclamation states that the GAL program “protects and defends children from harm and ensures that abused and neglected children are provided with the court-ordered services they need.”

Established by the N.C. legislature in 1983, the mission of the GAL program is to provide trained, independent advocates to represent and promote the best interests of abused, neglected, and dependent children in the state court system, and to work toward a plan that ensures that these children are in a safe, permanent home. Statewide, 64 offices, approximately 100 attorneys and more than 4,900 GAL volunteers work as a team to represent 15,373 children. However, more volunteers are needed to ensure that every child has someone to speak on their behalf.

“GAL volunteers assist attorney advocates and staff in making notable differences in the lives of children across North Carolina,” said McKinley Wooten Jr., GAL administrator and a deputy director with the N.C. Administrative Office of the Courts. “These volunteers give their time, experience and heart in order to advocate effectively for some of the most vulnerable children in their community. We encourage other North Carolinians to get involved with their local GAL program.”

 

To learn more, call toll-free (800) 982-4041 or visit www.ncgal.org.

Kernersville camp focuses on keeping kids fit and healthy

Kernersville camp focuses on keeping kids fit and healthy
4/21/2011:

Kernersville-based fitness company iLive Fitness has announced a Boot Camp for Kids, a summer camp program for ages six to 18 targeted toward getting kids moving, educated about exercise and good nutrition, and motivated to live a fit and healthy lifestyle.

 

“The most opportune time to teach kids to live healthy is now,” says Reginald Fair, founder and head fitness trainer. “Adults have established their eating habits, routines, and lifestyle priorities. Kids haven’t. It’s our job, now, to teach them that their health is a priority.”

 

The six-week camp will include a body diagnostic test, performance evaluation, fitness education, C.A.R.S. training (cardio, aerobic, resistance, strength) and nutrition discussions. Included in the $249 camp cost are drinks and snacks, a camp T-shirt, and a detailed workout plan upon the camp’s completion. Camps will be held from 10 a.m. to noon Monday, Wednesday and Friday June 20 through July 30 at Skate Haven in Winston-Salem.

 

To learn more, visit www.ilivefitness.com.

Perdue proclaims April N.C. Guardian ad Litem Child Advocate Month

Gov. Beverly Perdue has proclaimed April as North Carolina Guardian ad Litem (GAL) Child Advocate Month in recognition of the program’s mission of protecting and promoting the best interests of children in abuse and neglect court proceedings. While appreciating advocates who have donated more than 944,000 hours of service to children in all 100 counties, the proclamation also serves as a reminder of the immense need for more volunteers.

Perdue’s proclamation states that the GAL program “protects and defends children from harm and ensures that abused and neglected children are provided with the court-ordered services they need.”

Established by the N.C. legislature in 1983, the mission of the GAL program is to provide trained, independent advocates to represent and promote the best interests of abused, neglected, and dependent children in the state court system, and to work toward a plan that ensures that these children are in a safe, permanent home. Statewide, 64 offices, approximately 100 attorneys and more than 4,900 GAL volunteers work as a team to represent 15,373 children. However, more volunteers are needed to ensure that every child has someone to speak on their behalf.

“GAL volunteers assist attorney advocates and staff in making notable differences in the lives of children across North Carolina,” said McKinley Wooten Jr., GAL administrator and a deputy director with the N.C. Administrative Office of the Courts. “These volunteers give their time, experience and heart in order to advocate effectively for some of the most vulnerable children in their community. We encourage other North Carolinians to get involved with their local GAL program.”

 

To learn more, call toll-free (800) 982-4041 or visit www.ncgal.org.

Moses Cone names chief nursing officer

Theresa Brodrick, RN, MSN, Ph.D., has been named chief nursing officer and executive vice president for Moses Cone Health System. Brodrick, who starts her new role April 25, comes to Moses Cone from Virtua Health in Voorhees, N.J., where she was vice president of patient services.

 

“Theresa shares our drive to improve quality and patient satisfaction,” says Terry Akin, chief operating officer. “Her depth of experience and leadership abilities will help move Moses Cone Health System toward its goal of being a national leader in the delivery of health care.”

 

“I have found there is no better reward than to help others,” Brodrick says. “The nursing profession affords nurses the ability to do just that but also provides a magnitude of different career choices within the profession that are available across the nation and around the world.”

Moses Cone names chief nursing officer

Theresa Brodrick, RN, MSN, Ph.D., has been named chief nursing officer and executive vice president for Moses Cone Health System. Brodrick, who starts her new role April 25, comes to Moses Cone from Virtua Health in Voorhees, N.J., where she was vice president of patient services.

 

“Theresa shares our drive to improve quality and patient satisfaction,” says Terry Akin, chief operating officer. “Her depth of experience and leadership abilities will help move Moses Cone Health System toward its goal of being a national leader in the delivery of health care.”

 

“I have found there is no better reward than to help others,” Brodrick says. “The nursing profession affords nurses the ability to do just that but also provides a magnitude of different career choices within the profession that are available across the nation and around the world.”

Kernersville camp focuses on keeping kids fit and healthy

Kernersville-based fitness company iLive Fitness has announced a Boot Camp for Kids, a summer camp program for ages six to 18 targeted toward getting kids moving, educated about exercise and good nutrition, and motivated to live a fit and healthy lifestyle.

 

“The most opportune time to teach kids to live healthy is now,” says Reginald Fair, founder and head fitness trainer. “Adults have established their eating habits, routines, and lifestyle priorities. Kids haven’t. It’s our job, now, to teach them that their health is a priority.”

 

The six-week camp will include a body diagnostic test, performance evaluation, fitness education, C.A.R.S. training (cardio, aerobic, resistance, strength) and nutrition discussions. Included in the $249 camp cost are drinks and snacks, a camp T-shirt, and a detailed workout plan upon the camp’s completion. Camps will be held from 10 a.m. to noon Monday, Wednesday and Friday June 20 through July 30 at Skate Haven in Winston-Salem.

 

To learn more, visit www.ilivefitness.com.

Wake Forest Baptist faculty earn various awards

Two Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center faculty – Bettina Beech, Ph.D., professor of social sciences and health policy, and Dr. Amy McMichael, professor of dermatology, have been accepted into the Executive Leadership in Academic Medicine Program (ELAM), a training program for women in medicine. The program’s mission is to increase the number of women in leadership positions at academic health centers and their success rate in attaining and remaining in these positions.

 

Additionally, Dr. Ryan Stone, an instructor in the department of obstetrics and gynecology and a fellow in maternal fetal medicine, and Dr. Jim Rose, interim chair of the department of obstetrics and gynecology, received honors at the 58th annual meeting of the Society for Gynecologic Investigation. Rose received the 2011 Frederick Naftolin Award for Mentorship, which recognizes significant contributions to training and career development of society members working in the field of reproductive and women’s health. Stone earned an award for one of the top presentations by a fellow in training at the March 16-19 meeting. His winning presentation and poster was titled “Gender Related Effects of Prenatal Steroid Exposure on Renal Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 in Fetal Programmed Hypertension.”

A group of faculty and research fellows from Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center also received the 2011 Best Poster Overall award at the eighth annual American Psychosocial Oncology Society (APOS) conference. The award winning poster, titled “Health Related Quality of Life, Depressive Symptoms and Distress Before and After Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation,” was created by Richard McQuellon, Ph.D., and Ken Zamkoff, department of hematology and oncology; Greg Russell, director of the public health sciences division; Drs. David Hurd, Denise Levitan, and Seema Naik of internal medicine; and Brendan McQuellon, Cassie Campbell, Katie Duckworth and Jen Sommer.

 

Additionally, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center volunteer Charity Byrum has received the 2011 Forsyth County Governor’s award for Outstanding Volunteer Service in the student volunteer category. To date, she has contributed more than 575 hours of volunteer service and has participated in the Volunteen program for four summers.

 

To learn more, visit www.wakehealth.edu.

Burlington Aviation approved for funding

Burlington Aviation, a Cessna Pilot Center and FAA Part 141 flight school in Burlington, has been approved to receive both Veteran’s Administration Benefits from the GI Bill and funding from the N.C. National Guard Tuition Assistance Program.

 

Burlington Aviation will be the first flight school in the Triad to offer these programs to veterans, as well as people currently serving in the military and National Guard.

 

“We are honored to be able to offer education to current and former military personnel,” says Alan Ostroff, owner of Burlington Aviation. “Several of us here are ex-military, so we look forward to training anyone with a similar background.”

 

Approved training under the Post-9/11 GI Bill includes graduate and undergraduate degrees and vocational/technical training, as well as tutorial assistance and licensing and certification test reimbursement. The amount of support that an individual can qualify for depends upon city of residence and type of degree pursuing. At Burlington Aviation, Post-9/11 GI Bill benefits can be used toward instrument, commercial and multiengine training.

 

For more information, call (336) 227-1278 or visit www.burlingtonaviation.com.

Center for HomeOwnership wins HOPE award

The Center for Home Ownership (CHO) in Winston-Salem has been named a recipient of a HOPE award, a national industry accolade, for its commitment to helping minority families achieve and sustain their dream of buying and owning a home.

 

The award is conferred by a partnership of several real-estate organizations, including the National Association of Realtors in Washington, D.C. CHO was among seven organizations/individuals, and the only one in North Carolina, to earn the award. It was cited in the education category for its decade-long role as a full-service housing counseling center in Winston-Salem/Forsyth County, to which thousands have turned for pre-purchase counseling, credit rebuilding, homebuyer education, budgeting assistance, and other services. To date, it has helped more than 900 families, including many minority families, achieve first-time home ownership, with a foreclosure rate of less than 2 percent.

 

“We are deeply honored and grateful to the partnership sponsors for their recognition of CHO,” says Peter Laroche, president and CEO of Consumer Credit Counseling Service of Forsyth Inc., CHO’s parent organization. “Education is requisite in the complex process of homeownership. CHO strives to provide our communities with tools they need to make informed choices toward achieving their dreams.”